A Long Way Gone Essay Introduction

A Long Way Gone Essay Introduction-52
""Yes, all the time.""Cool."I smile a little."You should tell us about it sometime.""Yes, sometime."This is how wars are fought now: by children, hopped-up on drugs and wielding AK-47s. In the more than fifty conflicts going on worldwide, it is estimated that there are some 300,000 child soldiers. What is war like through the eyes of a child soldier? But until now, there has not been a first-person account from someone who came through this hell and survived. Beah, now 26, speaks in a distinctive voice, and he tells an important story.In A Long Way Gone, Beah, now twenty-five years old, tells a riveting story: how at the age of twelve, he fled attacking rebels and wandered a land rendered unrecognizable by violence. The great benefit of Ishmael Beah's memoir, A Long Way Gone, is that it may help us arrive at an understanding of this situation. Hundreds of thousands of child soldiers fight in dozens of nasty conflicts in Africa and elsewhere, and while journalists and the occasional novelist may write about them, A Long Way Gone is a first-person account."—John Corry, The Wall Street Journal"Everyone in the world should read this book.Despite the carnage, few readers will be able to look away . At the United Nations, he tells us, 'I had a speech that had been written for me in Freetown, but I decided to speak from my heart, instead.' So he has. If Beah's memoir depicts how easily children are lured into combat, it also examines how difficult it is for them to emerge from it."—Fatin Abbas, The Nation"Beah's story is a wrenching survivor's tale, but there's no self-pity or political digression to be found. Beah's uncompromising voice is a potent elegy for their suffering, a powerful reminder of the innocent casualties of war."—The Miami Herald"Beah tells his amazing and agonizing story in a new memoir, A Long Way Gone. If you can read A Long Way Gone without being touched somewhere deep inside, you might need to think about changing the ice water in your veins."—The Denver Post"That Beah survived at all, let alone survived with any capacity for hope and joy at all, is stunning, and testament to incredible courage-both his and that of the millions of men and women who fight against wars with eerie grace and grim patience.

""Yes, all the time.""Cool."I smile a little."You should tell us about it sometime.""Yes, sometime."This is how wars are fought now: by children, hopped-up on drugs and wielding AK-47s. In the more than fifty conflicts going on worldwide, it is estimated that there are some 300,000 child soldiers. What is war like through the eyes of a child soldier? But until now, there has not been a first-person account from someone who came through this hell and survived. Beah, now 26, speaks in a distinctive voice, and he tells an important story.In A Long Way Gone, Beah, now twenty-five years old, tells a riveting story: how at the age of twelve, he fled attacking rebels and wandered a land rendered unrecognizable by violence. The great benefit of Ishmael Beah's memoir, A Long Way Gone, is that it may help us arrive at an understanding of this situation. Hundreds of thousands of child soldiers fight in dozens of nasty conflicts in Africa and elsewhere, and while journalists and the occasional novelist may write about them, A Long Way Gone is a first-person account."—John Corry, The Wall Street Journal"Everyone in the world should read this book.Despite the carnage, few readers will be able to look away . At the United Nations, he tells us, 'I had a speech that had been written for me in Freetown, but I decided to speak from my heart, instead.' So he has. If Beah's memoir depicts how easily children are lured into combat, it also examines how difficult it is for them to emerge from it."—Fatin Abbas, The Nation"Beah's story is a wrenching survivor's tale, but there's no self-pity or political digression to be found. Beah's uncompromising voice is a potent elegy for their suffering, a powerful reminder of the innocent casualties of war."—The Miami Herald"Beah tells his amazing and agonizing story in a new memoir, A Long Way Gone. If you can read A Long Way Gone without being touched somewhere deep inside, you might need to think about changing the ice water in your veins."—The Denver Post"That Beah survived at all, let alone survived with any capacity for hope and joy at all, is stunning, and testament to incredible courage-both his and that of the millions of men and women who fight against wars with eerie grace and grim patience.

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Whatever excuses and defenses and rationalizations we offer for war, whenever we say that war is any sort of rational act, Beah's voice is now forever raised to call war what it is: madness."—The Oregonian (Portland)"It was with a certain amount of dread that I cracked open the cover of this book, a little frightened of what horror lay in store. As I read, I flipped the book over again and again to look at the large color photo of the author on the back, trying to reconcile lines like "we walked around the village and shot everyone who came out of the houses and huts" with the image of Beah's sweet, widely-smiling face.

And this book is, indeed, filled with horror and haunting imagery-but it is also about hope and resilience, too . Beah's ability to persevere is astonishing, his very survival a testament to some kind of ferocious will.

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Often, he relies on the distanced perspective of a storyteller. In place of a text that has every right to be a diatribe against Sierra Leone, globalization or even himself, Beah has produced a book of such self-effacing humanity that refugees, political fronts and even death squads resolve themselves back into the faces of mothers, father and siblings. Reports about child soldiers and the crises in Africa proliferate, but Beah's story, with its clear-eyed reporting and literate particularity-whether he's dancing to rap, eating a coconut or running toward the burning village where his family is trapped-demands to be read."—People "Beah's memoir, A Long Way Gone, is unforgettable testimony that Africa's children-millions of them dying and orphaned by preventable diseases, hundreds of thousands of them forced into battle-have eyes to see and voices to tell what has happened. How is it possible that 26-year-old Beah, a nonnative English speaker, separated from his family at age 12, taught to maim and to kill at 13, can sound such notes of family happiness, of friendship under duress, of quiet horror?

But when Beah is finally approached about the possibility of serving as a spokesperson on the issue of child soldiers, he knows exactly what he wants to tell the world: '"We can be rehabilitated," I would emphasize, and point to myself as an example. powerful fragments of traditional African folklore. His willingness to share the comfort that things like tall tales, the face of the moon, or the smell of traditional foods bring him is sobering. Scenes the author witnessed and participated in are described in gruesome detail . A Long Way Gone transports us into the lives of thousands of children whose lives have been altered by war, and it does so with a genuine and disarmingly emotional force."—Richard Thompson, The Star Tribune (Minneapolis) "Terrifying, often graphic in portraying the violence he both witnessed and carried out as a barely adolescent soldier in Sierra Leone, 26-year-old Beah's story is also deeply moving, even uplifting . No outsider could have written this book, and it's hard to imagine that many insiders could do so with such acute vision, stark language, and tenderness.The sparse prose gives the sense that he wrote this memoir as much to mark his passage out of hell, in case he should again have to wonder there, as he did to enlighten us."—Lucas Lund, Hippo"This is the powerful, poignant story of Ishmael Beah, who grew up in Sierra Leone, and at age twelve was displaced and torn from his family because of war, and began to wander with a group of displaced boys, who endured brutal hardships and were also taught to kill and brutalize people before maturity.Later on, Beah joins the government forces and eventually finds himself in a program to rehabilitate children who have become soldiers, and later on he escapes all of this as a refugee to USA.Although not so detailed with the specifics of history and the Sierra Leone civil war and 'blood diamonds' and 'lost boys', this makes up for it in Beah's vivid personal detail of how he was torn from his family, and thrown into a life of survival and savagery, and how later through all of it he managed to later realize his hopes and dreams.To me, it shows the resilience of the human spirit and also how even though sometimes in order to survive, our life directs us into circumstances beyond our control, and yet, we still all have the capability to find compassion, hope and peace within ourselves.All rights reserved Any content, trademarks, or other material that might be found on the scienceonreligion website that is not scienceonreligion property remains the copyright of its respective owners.In no way does scienceonreligion claim ownership or responsibility for such items, and you should seek legal consent for any use of such materials from its owner..He witnessed small children, sudden orphans, wandering the streets crying for their dead parents; listened to his friend's account of his sisters' rape; saw a man who had had all his fingers but the thumbs cut off.He participated in atrocious acts that made him no better than the rebels who'd killed his family, taken advantage of by a military who robbed him of his childhood.These boys, on either side, didn't have the foggiest idea of the reasons for their war.The proselytizers, colonists, foreign entrepreneurs, politicians, even cheesy moviemakers all played a part in it-committing murder by proxy. The faint good news in these pages is that if we're lucky, very lucky, we may be able to sneak out of this life without being either murderer or victim. It would have been enough if Ishmael Beah had merely survived the horrors described in A Long Way Gone. it is his account of rehabilitation that most occupies the reader's mind-how these children who become addicted to drugs and violence are able to re-enter the world of civil society."—Jeff Rice, Chicago Tribune"Beah's book tells the harrowing story of a brutal child soldier committing terrible acts.

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