Atomic Bomb Cold War Essay

1205 – July 13, 1945 Oak Ridge petition, mid-July 1945 Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 - Radiation Monitoring Trinity Test, July 16, 1945 - Eyewitness Accounts Pages from President Truman's diary, July 16, 1945 Truman's diary entries on Potsdam from the President's Secretary's file, July 16, 1945 Cable to Secretary of State from Acting Secretary Joseph Grew suggesting that the Japanese be permitted to retain the Emperor, July 16, 1945 Henry Stimson's Diary, Diary entries for July 16 through 25, 1945 "Magic" – Diplomatic Summary of Japanese Position, War Department, Office of Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, No. Bernstein, "Truman At Potsdam: His Secret Diary," Foreign Service Journal, July/August 1980 Memorandum from General L. Groves to Secretary of War, "The Test," July 18, 1945, Top Secret, Excised Copy General Leslie Groves' Memorandum Describing the First Nuclear Test In New Mexico, 18 July 1945 Memorandum for the Secretary of War 18 July 1945, with attached drawing with notes of the atomic cloud, presumably by Lansing Lamont, July 16, 1945 Truman's diary entries from the President's Secretary's file, dates from July 17,1945 - July 30, 1945 Two photographs of a meeting of President Truman, Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Premier Joseph Stalin at Potsdam, Germany, July 19, 1945, with notes by President Truman written on the reverse Interim Committee Log, Memorandum for the Record, 20 July 1945 through 12 Sept. Groves, "The Base of Operations of the 509th Composite Group," February 24, 1945, Top Secret Albert Einstein to President Roosevelt, March 25, 1945, and subsequent correspondence Stimson mentions the Bomb to Truman after 12 April Cabinet Meeting, 12 April 1945 Memorandum for the Secretary of War from General L. Groves, "Atomic Fission Bombs," April 23, 1945 Stimson Informs Truman about the Bomb, Memorandum, April, 24 1945. 1204 – July 12, 1945 Oak Ridge petition, July 13, 1945 John Weckerling, Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, July 12, 1945, to Deputy Chief of Staff, "Japanese Peace Offer," 13 July 1945 "Magic"– Diplomatic Summary, War Department, Office of Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, No. Lapp, Leo Szilard et al., "A Petition to the President of the United States," July 17, 1945 A PETITION TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, 17 July 1945 Cable War 33556 from Harrison to Secretary of War on the Trinity Test, July 17, 1945 Pages from President Truman's diary, July 17, 18, and 25, 1945 Barton J.

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Giangreco, "Casualty Projections for the US Invasions of Japan, 1945-46: Planning and Policy Implications," Journal of Military History, 61 (July 1997): 521-82 Memorandum discussed with the President on the existence of the Atomic Bomb, April 25, 1945 Untitled memorandum by General L. Groves on the discussion with President Truman, April 25, 1945 Henry Stimson Diary, Diary Entry, April 25, 1945 D. 11 July-30 July, 1945 "Magic" – Diplomatic Summary of Japanese Peace Feelers through the Soviet Union, War Department, Office of Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, No.

Interim Committee Log, 2 July 1945 through 28 July 1945 Szilard Petition, First Version, July 3, 1945 Szilard petition, cover letter, July 4, 1945 Groves Seeks Evidence Against Szilard, July 4, 1945 Notes of the Interim Committee Meeting, Friday, 6 July 1945 Minutes, Secretary's Staff Committee, Saturday Morning, July 7, 1945, 133d Meeting Combined Chiefs of Staff, “ Estimate of the Enemy Situation as of 6 July 1945, C. S 643/3, July 8, 1945, Secret (Appendices Not Included) Telegrams communicating Japanese Peace Feelers through the Soviet Union.

1236 – August 13, 1945 "The Second Sacred Judgment", August 14, 1945 Source: Hiroshi [Kaian) Shimomura, Shusenki [Account of the End of the War] (Tokyo, Kamakura Bunko, [1948], 148-152 [Translated by Toshihiro Higuchi] Leo Szilard to Matthew J.

Connelly, August 17, 1945 "Magic" – Far East Summary on Japanese Assessment of Destruction of Nagasaki, War Department, Office of Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, no.

Davies Diary, Diary entry for May 21, 1945 on Truman's Concern about Diplomatic Issues Concerning the Use of the Bomb Notes of the Interim Committee Meeting, Thursday, Notes of the Interim Committee Meeting, Friday, 1 June 1945 Joint Chiefs of Staff knowledge of the Atom Bomb and Chronology regarding Truman from 6/45 -7/24/45 The Franck Report, June 11, 1945 Glenn T. Lawrence, June 13, 1945 Recommendations on the Immediate Use of Nuclear Weapons, by the Scientific Panel of the Interim Committee on Nuclear Power, June 16, 1945. Gordon Arneson, Interim Committee Secretary, to Mr. Harrison to Secretary of War Summarizing the Views of the Scientists, June 26, 1945 Memorandum from George L.

Groves, "Summary of Target Committee Meetings on 10 and ," May 12, 1945, Top Secret Notes of an Informal Meeting of the Interim Committee, Monday, Henry Stimson Diary, Diary Entries, May 14 and 15, 1945 Notes of an Informal Meeting of the Interim Committee, Friday, Joseph E. Hoover," June 13, 1945 Memorandum from Chief of Staff Marshall to the Secretary of War, 15 June 1945, enclosing "Memorandum of Comments on 'Ending the Japanese War,'" June 14, 1945 Memorandum by J. Oppenheimer, "Recommendations on the Immediate Use of Nuclear Weapons," June 16, 1945 "Minutes of Meeting Held at the White House on Monday, 18 June 1945 at 1530" Memorandum from R.

Compton to the Secretary of War, enclosing "Memorandum on 'Political and Social Problems,' from Members of the 'Metallurgical Laboratory' of the University of Chicago," June 12, 1945 Memorandum from Acting Secretary of State Joseph Grew to the President, "Analysis of Memorandum Presented by Mr.

Harrison on Targeting Options, June 6, 1945 Memorandum of Conference with the President on the Use of the Bomb, June 6, 1945 Memorandum from Arthur B.

Truman and the Great War," 7 April 2002 The A-Bomb Project Voice of Hibakusha, Oral Testimonies of Hiroshima Survivors The Trinity Site General Paul Tibbets and the Enola Gay The Hiroshima Archives Hiroshima: Was It Necessary? Giangreco, US Army Command and General Staff College, 16 February 1998 H-Net, Lloyd Gardner's Cold War Essay H-Net, Re: Gardner Cold War Essay H-Net, Fourteen Notes on the Very Concept of the Cold War, Anders Stephanson, Columbia University HIROSHIMA: HARRY TRUMAN'S DIARY AND PAPERS HIROSHIMA: HENRY STIMSON'S DIARY AND PAPERS: Part 1 (12/31/44 - 4/11/45) HIROSHIMA: RALPH BARD'S ALTERNATIVE TO A-BOMBING JAPAN A-Bomb WWW Museum Remembering Nagasaki The Hiroshima Archive Hiroshima Directory ENOLA GAY EXHIBIT, THE HISTORIANS' LETTER TO THE SMITHSONIAN, 1995 HIROSHIMA: HARRY TRUMAN'S DIARY AND PAPERS J. 1221- July 29, 1945 Cable, Secretary of War to President Truman, July 30, 1945, with a handwritten response by the President on the reverse Message to President Truman from the Secretary of War, 30 July 1945, with handwritten response from Truman Leslie R. Marshall), 30 July 1945 Memorandum from Major General L. Groves to Chief of Staff, July 30, 1945, Top Secret, Sanitized Copy "Magic" – Diplomatic Summary on Japanese-Russian Discussions, War Department, Office of Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, No.

Army Command and General Staff College, Transcript of "The Soldier from Independence: Harry S. Conant, Office of Scientific Research and Development, to Secretary of War, September 30, 1944, Top Secret J. Handy to General Carl Spaatz, July 26, 1945 Potsdam Proclamation, 26 July 1945 Ambassador Davies Diary, Diary entry for July 29, 1945 "Magic" – Diplomatic Summary of Japanese Reaction to the Potsdam Declaration, War Department, Office of Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2, No.

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    Nuclear Weapons and the Escalation of the Cold War, 1945-1962,” in Odd Arne Westad and Melvin Leffler, eds. The Cambridge History of the Cold War, vol. 1 Cambridge University Press, 2010 376-397.…

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