Creative Writing Resources

Creative Writing Resources-42
Let each child take the mascot (and a book in which to write) home for a few days at a time.While they are looking after the mascot, they should write a short story in the book outlining what the mascot has done during its stay with them. When the mascot returns to school, spend some time discussing what it has done and where it has been. A good way of asking children to use their descriptive writing skills is to ask them to invent a new animal.

Argue with them, saying that you have heard differently. Finally, say that as Paul is missing, we will have to make some missing person posters, explaining who Paul is (with a picture so others can identify him!

), where he was last seen and who to contact if he is found.

Find a small soft toy or puppet which will become the class mascot.

With the class, choose a name for the mascot, and discuss its background (where it comes from, its friends and family, its likes and dislikes etc.).

Read "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" (by Jon Scieszka) with the children.

This tells the "Three Little Pigs" story from the wolf's point of view.Great for oral discussion but also useful for character analysis. By Ruth O’Neil Does your homeschool students’ creative writing seem lifeless?For the purposes of the lesson, pretend that this space is where "Paul" normally sits. They will probably look at you as though you are mad, but continually ask them where "Paul" is today.Tell them that he normally sits in his space (point to the empty chair) and that he was there yesterday, but he isn't there today. Hopefully someone will make up a reason why "Paul" isn't in today. Continue like this for a while, with the children explaining where he is.Remind the children of the story and read chapter 15 - a description of the Chocolate Room.Ask the children who have read the story if they can think of any of the other rooms in the factory.Mad: She stomped into the room, swinging her arms for all she was worth with a grumpy look on her face.Bored: She ever so slowly slumped into the room, rolling her eyes giving the impression that class was the last place she wanted to be.When finished, the children could actually make the books for younger children in the school to read. Remind the children of the story and read the "Dreams" chapter to give the children some ideas. They could set it out like a cooking recipe with ingredients and mixing instructions and there should also be a short description of the dream (which could be a "Golden Phizzwizard" or a "Trogglehumper"). Xargle story in which he teaches his class about a different aspect of Earth life (e.g. This will encourage them to look at everyday life from a different point of view.When all of the recipes are finished, they could be made into a "Dream Recipe Cook Book". Xargle series of books written by Jeanne Willis and illustrated by Tony Ross. If there is enough time, they could also make illustrations to accompany their text.

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