How To Solve Calorimetry Problems

How To Solve Calorimetry Problems-30
Check Your Learning A 248-g piece of copper initially at 314 °C is dropped into 390 m L of water initially at 22.6 °C.Assuming that all heat transfer occurs between the copper and the water, calculate the final temperature.General chemistry students often use simple calorimeters constructed from polystyrene cups (Figure 2).

Check Your Learning A 248-g piece of copper initially at 314 °C is dropped into 390 m L of water initially at 22.6 °C.Assuming that all heat transfer occurs between the copper and the water, calculate the final temperature.General chemistry students often use simple calorimeters constructed from polystyrene cups (Figure 2).

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Identifying a Metal by Measuring Specific Heat A 59.7 g piece of metal that had been submerged in boiling water was quickly transferred into 60.0 m L of water initially at 22.0 °C. Use these data to determine the specific heat of the metal. Solution Assuming perfect heat transfer, Comparing this with values in Table 1 in Chapter 5.1 Energy Basics, our experimental specific heat is closest to the value for copper (0.39 J/g °C), so we identify the metal as copper.

Check Your Learning A 92.9-g piece of a silver/gray metal is heated to 178.0 °C, and then quickly transferred into 75.0 m L of water initially at 24.0 °C.

When an endothermic reaction occurs, the heat required is absorbed from the thermal energy of the solution, which decreases its temperature (Figure 1).

The temperature change, along with the specific heat and mass of the solution, can then be used to calculate the amount of heat involved in either case.

If we place the metal in the water, heat will flow from M to W.

The temperature of M will decrease, and the temperature of W will increase, until the two substances have the same temperature—that is, when they reach thermal equilibrium (Figure 4).

The final temperature of the water was measured as 42.7 °C.

Calculate the initial temperature of the piece of rebar.

Scientists use well-insulated calorimeters that all but prevent the transfer of heat between the calorimeter and its environment.

This enables the accurate determination of the heat involved in chemical processes, the energy content of foods, and so on.

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