John Keats Ode To Autumn Essay

John Keats Ode To Autumn Essay-21
In the third stanza, the speaker tells Autumn not to wonder where the songs of spring have gone, but instead to listen to her own music.At twilight, the “small gnats” hum among the "the river sallows," or willow trees, lifted and dropped by the wind, and “full-grown lambs” bleat from the hills, crickets sing, robins whistle from the garden, and swallows, gathering for their coming migration, sing from the skies.Most importantly, the image of Autumn winnowing and harvesting (in a sequence of odes often explicitly about creativity) recalls an earlier Keats poem in which the activity of harvesting is an explicit metaphor for artistic creation.

Tags: Best Australian Essays 2013 ReviewGay Marriage Pro ThesisHomework ScienceNational History Day ThesisBachelor Thesis SharepointDhcp Assignment

The extraordinary achievement of this poem lies in its ability to suggest, explore, and develop a rich abundance of themes without ever ruffling its calm, gentle, and lovely description of autumn.

Where “Ode on Melancholy” presents itself as a strenuous heroic quest, “To Autumn” is concerned with the much quieter activity of daily observation and appreciation.

The first part of each stanza follows an ABAB rhyme scheme, the first line rhyming with the third, and the second line rhyming with the fourth.

The second part of each stanza is longer and varies in rhyme scheme: The first stanza is arranged CDEDCCE, and the second and third stanzas are arranged CDECDDE.

The poem has three eleven-line stanzas which describe a progression through the season, from the late maturation of the crops to the harvest and to the last days of autumn when winter is nearing.

The imagery is richly achieved through the personification of Autumn, and the description of its bounty, its sights and sounds.(Thematically, the first part of each stanza serves to define the subject of the stanza, and the second part offers room for musing, development, and speculation on that subject; however, this thematic division is only very general.) In both its form and descriptive surface, “To Autumn” is one of the simplest of Keats’s odes.There is nothing confusing or complex in Keats’s paean to the season of autumn, with its fruitfulness, its flowers, and the song of its swallows gathering for migration.In terms of both thematic organization and rhyme scheme, each stanza is divided roughly into two parts.In each stanza, the first part is made up of the first four lines of the stanza, and the second part is made up of the last seven lines.His efforts from spring until autumn were dedicated completely to a career in poetry, alternating between writing long and short poems, and setting himself a goal to compose more than fifty lines of verse each day.In his free time he also read works as varied as Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, Thomas Chatterton's poetry, and Leigh Hunt's essays.The understated sense of inevitable loss in that final line makes it one of the most moving moments in all of poetry; it can be read as a simple, uncomplaining summation of the entire human condition.Despite the coming chill of winter, the late warmth of autumn provides Keats’s speaker with ample beauty to celebrate: the cottage and its surroundings in the first stanza, the agrarian haunts of the goddess in the second, and the locales of natural creatures in the third.The poem marks the final moment of his career as a poet.No longer able to afford to devote his time to the composition of poems, he began working on more lucrative projects.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments John Keats Ode To Autumn Essay

The Latest from ecotext2.ru ©