Memorable Present Essay

Include the reason it was given, a description of it, and how you felt when you got it.Edit and revise your essay Check your spelling and grammar Subjects and verbs agree, and verb tenses are consistent Examine your whole essay for logic Thought builds and flows? James Hayward, one of New England’s leading railroad engineers, estimated that penetrating the Hoosac would cost, at most, a very manageable two million dollars. The project cost more than ten times the budgeted estimate.

Tags: Thesis On Research MethodsMicrosoft Crm Case StudiesBp Case Study TncExamples Of An Outline For An EssayUseful Language For Writing An EssayExamples Of Research Proposal

the mid-nineteenth century, work began on a crucial section of the railway line connecting Boston to the Hudson River.

The addition would run from Greenfield, Massachusetts, to Troy, New York, and it required tunnelling through Hoosac Mountain, a massive impediment, nearly five miles thick, that blocked passage between the Deerfield Valley and a tributary of the Hudson. is believed to be the only barrier between Boston and the Pacific,” the project’s promoter, Alvah Crocker, declared. Digging through the Hoosac turned out to be a nightmare.

Consider this, from the same essay (and, remember, this is an While we are rather willing and even eager and relieved to agree with a historian’s finding that we stumbled into the more shameful events of history, such as war, we are correspondingly unwilling to concede—in fact we find it intolerable to imagine—that our more lofty achievements, such as economic, social or political progress, could have come about by stumbling rather than through careful planning. Adelman brilliantly and beautifully brings Hirschman to life, giving us an unforgettable portrait of one of the twentieth century’s most extraordinary intellectuals.

Hirschman was born in Berlin in 1915, into a prosperous family of Jewish origin.

He was a “planner,” the kind of economist who conceives of grand infrastructure projects and bold schemes.

But his eye was drawn to the many ways in which plans did not turn out the way they were supposed to—to unintended consequences and perverse outcomes and the puzzling fact that the shortest line between two points is often a dead end.“The Principle of the Hiding Hand,” one of Hirschman’s many memorable essays, drew on an account of the Troy-Greenfield “folly,” and then presented an even more elaborate series of paradoxes.

In other words, we would not consciously engage upon tasks whose success clearly requires that creativity be forthcoming.

Hence, the only way in which we can bring our creative resources fully into play is by misjudging the nature of the task, by presenting it to ourselves as more routine, simple, undemanding of genuine creativity than it will turn out to be.

If bad planning hadn’t led to the crisis at the Karnaphuli plant, the mill’s operators would never have been forced to be creative.

And the plant would not have been nearly as valuable as it became.“We may be dealing here with a general principle of action,” Hirschman wrote: Creativity always comes as a surprise to us; therefore we can never count on it and we dare not believe in it until it has happened.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Memorable Present Essay

The Latest from ecotext2.ru ©