Message To Garcia Essay

Message To Garcia Essay-34
’” Hubbard went on in this vein for several more pages, citing examples of how employees shirk and whine while questioning orders and instructions.Faced with these workers, the employer yearns for a man who, when given a letter to García, “quietly…[does] aught else but deliver it.” “Civilization,” Hubbard declared, “is one long anxious search for just such individuals…the man who can carry a message to García.” Hubbard thought so little of this essay that he published it in as filler on the empty page, without a title.Soon orders came for more copies, and eventually 40 million reprints of that article were distributed around the world.

’” Hubbard went on in this vein for several more pages, citing examples of how employees shirk and whine while questioning orders and instructions.Faced with these workers, the employer yearns for a man who, when given a letter to García, “quietly…[does] aught else but deliver it.” “Civilization,” Hubbard declared, “is one long anxious search for just such individuals…the man who can carry a message to García.” Hubbard thought so little of this essay that he published it in as filler on the empty page, without a title.Soon orders came for more copies, and eventually 40 million reprints of that article were distributed around the world.

” There is a man whose form should be cast in bronze and the statue placed in every college of the land. We have recently been hearing much maudlin sympathy expressed for the “downtrodden denizens of the sweat-shop” and the “homeless wanderers in searching for honest employment” and with it all often go many hard words for the men in power.

It is not book-learning young men need, nor instruction about this and that, but a stiffening of the vertebrae which will cause them to be loyal to a trust, to act promptly, to concentrate their energies: do the thing—“carry a message to Garcia.” General Garcia is dead now, but there are other “Garcias.” No man who has endeavored to carry out an enterprise where many hands were needed has not been appalled by the inability or unwillingness of workers to concentrate on a task and do it. Nothing is said about the employer who grows old before his time in a vain attempt to get frowzy ne’er-do-wells to do intelligent work, and his long, patient striving with “help” that does nothing but loaf when his back is turned.

Slipshod assistance, foolish inattention, dowdy indifference, and halfhearted work seem to be the rule. In every store and factory there is a constant weeding-out process going on.

Put this matter to a test: You are sitting now in your office—six clerks are within call. The employer is constantly sending away “help” that have shown their incapacity to further the interests of the business.

Summon any one and make this request: “Please look in the encyclopedia and make a brief memorandum for me concerning the life of Correggio.” Will the clerk quietly say, “Yes, sir,” and go do the task? He will look at you out of a fishy eye and ask one or more of the following questions: Who was he? I know one really brilliant man who has not the ability to manage a business of his own and yet who is absolutely worthless to anyone else, because he carries with him constantly the suspicion that his employer is oppressing or intending to oppress him.

He cannot give orders, and he will not receive them.

How ‘the fellow by name of Rowan’ took the letter, sealed it up in an oil-skin pouch, strapped it over his heart, in four days landed by night off the coast of Cuba from an open boat, disappeared into the jungle, and in three weeks came out on the other side of the Island, having traversed a hostile country on foot, and delivered it to García” was an indubitable epic of heroism.

The point Hubbard wished to make was this: “Mc Kinley gave Rowan a letter to be delivered to García; Rowan took the letter and did not ask: ‘Where is he at?

How “the fellow by the name of Rowan” took the letter, sealed it up in an oilskin pouch, strapped it over his heart, in four days landed by night off the coast of Cuba from an open boat, disappeared into the jungle, and in three weeks came out on the other side of the island, having traversed a hostile country on foot and delivered his letter to Garcia—are things I have no special desire now to tell in detail. After you have answered his questions and explained how to find the information and why you want it, the clerk will no doubt go off and get one of the other clerks to help him try to find “Garcia”—and then come back and tell you there’s no such man.

The point that I wish to make is this: Mc Kinley gave Rowan a letter to be delivered to Garcia; Rowan took the letter and did not ask, “Where is he at? This incapacity for independent action, this moral stupidity, this infirmity of the will, this unwillingness to cheerfully catch hold and lift—these are the things that drive employers to despair.

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