Pink Floyd Research Paper

Pink Floyd Research Paper-35
Discussing Pink Floyd and The Wall Rock Opera Pink Floyd's "the Wall" is arguably one of the most intriguing and imaginative albums in the history of rock music.Since its release in 1979, and the subsequent movie of 1982, the Wall has become synonymous with, if not the very definition of, the term "concept album." Aurally explosive on record and visually explosive on the screen, the Wall traces the life of the fictional protagonist, Pink Floyd, from his boyhood days in war-torn England to his self-imposed isolation as a world-renowned rock star, leading to a climax that is as questionably cathartic as it is destructive.In 1963, he and Mason joined an existing group, Sigma 6, where they met keyboard player Wright, who loved jazz and classical music.

Discussing Pink Floyd and The Wall Rock Opera Pink Floyd's "the Wall" is arguably one of the most intriguing and imaginative albums in the history of rock music.Since its release in 1979, and the subsequent movie of 1982, the Wall has become synonymous with, if not the very definition of, the term "concept album." Aurally explosive on record and visually explosive on the screen, the Wall traces the life of the fictional protagonist, Pink Floyd, from his boyhood days in war-torn England to his self-imposed isolation as a world-renowned rock star, leading to a climax that is as questionably cathartic as it is destructive.

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They played and sang despite their bitterness, in part because the evening’s cause – to try to persuade the world’s richest countries to forgive the debts of the poorest – was in keeping with belief systems they genuinely shared.

But there was another reason for assembling that night that ran deeper in their history.

The contributions of band mates David Gilmour, Nick Mason, and Richard Wright, provided the final brush strokes for Pink, a contemporary anti-hero, a modern everyman struggling to find, or arguably lose, self and meaning in a century fragmented by war.

The Wall is the most startling rhetorical achievement in the group's singular, thirteen-year career.

Waters left Cambridge in 1962 to take architecture courses at Regent Street Polytechnic in London, where he met fellow student Mason.

He was already playing guitar – in fact, he sometimes practiced in class when he didn’t want to study.Drawing on these feelings of adult alienation as well as those springing from the loss of his own father during World War II, Waters began to flesh out the fictional character of Pink.The band's first front man, Syd Barrett, and the wild stories surrounding his drugged-out escapades and subsequent withdrawal from the world provided Waters with further inspiration for the moody rock-star Pink.Guitarist and singer Gilmour, he said, “doesn’t have any ideas,” and drummer Mason “can’t play” (Waters had long before thrown keyboardist Wright out of the band). When he took his version of the band on tour, he appropriated Waters’ most famous prop, a gigantic pig balloon, and attached testicles to it, which some read as a commentary on how he viewed the band’s former bassist. “Fuck them.”) The long squabble resulted in the deepest, ugliest split in rock & roll’s history, and almost certainly the most irreparable.On that warm London night in early July 2005 when the four men finally gathered again as Pink Floyd in London’s Hyde Park at the historic Live 8 concert, it’s unlikely that all the past anger and hurt was easily forgotten or healed, but that’s partly what made the moment so moving.Waters and Gilmour had famously shown contempt for each other for a quarter-century – each felt the other had tried to dishonor his life’s work and hinder his future.After Waters started a solo career in 1984, he went on to disparage his former bandmates.Despite both triumphs and wounds, the band’s members couldn’t escape a certain bond – not just a hatred for one another, but also a realization that without the community they once had, their music could never have mattered.Most of them were either born in or grew up around Cambridge – a well-off university town that prized a progressive streak – and appeared headed for careers in the arts.He was already trying the patience of his lecturers.“I could have been an architect, but I don’t think I’d have been very happy,” he told journalist Caroline Boucher in 1970.

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