Productivity Research Papers

Productivity Research Papers-47
While it’s hard to argue against the suggestion, Anchor’s talk manages to back the claim with compelling numbers.Written (with lab-based researchers in mind) by Duke University microbiologist Ben Mudrak, this blog stresses the importance of planning and organisation for improved productivity.While some of these might not be to everyone’s tastes — his preferred habit of working in parallel on several topics sounds infuriating to me — some of his other topics like preparing your workspace thoroughly and his encouraging writing style make this an interesting read.

While it’s hard to argue against the suggestion, Anchor’s talk manages to back the claim with compelling numbers.Written (with lab-based researchers in mind) by Duke University microbiologist Ben Mudrak, this blog stresses the importance of planning and organisation for improved productivity.While some of these might not be to everyone’s tastes — his preferred habit of working in parallel on several topics sounds infuriating to me — some of his other topics like preparing your workspace thoroughly and his encouraging writing style make this an interesting read.

The Division of Productivity Research and Program Development (DPRPD) works on strengthening and improving Bureau productivity measures and on understanding the sources and effects of productivity and technical change.

The Division’s economists work on clarifying input and output concepts for productivity measures, using methods from microeconomic and macroeconomic theory, labor economics, industrial organization, econometrics, and statistics.

I particularly like Professor Rotello from UMass’s extended analogy about owning a house.

He uses this to explain how an effective researcher owns their research and is proactive about looking after it.“It is critical for scientists to see a research project as a whole,” Rotello advises, “and to carefully plan each piece that needs to be done.”Author: Dr Matt Allinson Thousands of academics around the world are already using RESEARCHER to browse their favourite journals.

Additionally (and incredibly), employee attrition decreased by 50 percent among the telecommuters, they took shorter breaks, had fewer sick days, and took less time off.

Not to mention the reduced carbon emissions from fewer autos clogging up the morning commute.

One surprising finding did put a cautionary veneer over going all in on work-from-home, however.

More than half the volunteer group changed their minds about working from home 100 percent of the time--they felt too much isolation.

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