Puttermesser Papers Wiki

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In conversation, one hears a soft, youthful tinkle, clear as a bell.Then there is the unfailing Old World politeness, the refinement of language, and a bright eagerness in the voice to share her thoughts, to hold nothing back.She was, however, excellent in the bookish arts, such as grammar, spelling, reading, and writing.

In conversation, one hears a soft, youthful tinkle, clear as a bell.Then there is the unfailing Old World politeness, the refinement of language, and a bright eagerness in the voice to share her thoughts, to hold nothing back.She was, however, excellent in the bookish arts, such as grammar, spelling, reading, and writing.

"Some day when I am free of PS 71, I will write stories.

Meanwhile, in winter dusk, in the Park View, in the secret bliss of the Violet Fairy Book, I both see and do not how these grains of life will stay forever." Ozick owes her metamorphosis into a writer to the fact that her mother's brother, Abraham Regelson, was a Hebrew poet of no mean reputation.

"My father loved me," she told an interviewer, "but I think one of the reasons from earliest childhood I felt free to be a writer is that if I had en a boy, I would have had to go be something else." School became a serious pursuit for Ozick when she entered Hunter College High School in Manhattan.

There she was made to feel part of an elite, a Hunter girl, in a place where academic excellence set one apart.

It is not without interest that, according to his daughter, he wrote beautiful Hebrew paragraphs and had a Talmudist's rationalism.

However, life was not without its childhood pain At the age of five and a half, Ozick entered heder, the Yiddish-Hebrew "room" where, in the America of those years, Jewish pupils were sent for religious instruction.

Ozick describes her mother's life as a life of total generosity, of lavishness, of exuberance, of untrammeled laughter.

Her father, a discreet, quiet man, a talmid khokhem [a Jewish scholar], who also knew both Latin and German from his Russian gymnasium years, ground and mixed powders and entered prescriptions meticulously in his record book.

What does this "seventeen-to-twenty-two-year-old" energetic, ambitious writer, who sees a whole row of luminescent novels on the horizon, have in common with this sixty-six-year-old woman who is resigned to her failures?

"I would not trade places with her," shouts Shoshana, "for all the china in Teaneck." Cynthia Ozick was born in New York City on April 17, 1928, the second of two children.

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