Research Proposal On Domestic Violence

Research Proposal On Domestic Violence-39
This report examines the educational, career, and economic effects of intimate partner violence by presenting findings from a survey of 164 survivors developed by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) and administered at transitional housing programs, shelters, and other domestic violence programs in 11 states and the District of Columbia.Though not representative of all survivors, the survey explores the self-reported effects of abuse on survivors in the sample and the resources they find most helpful in addressing the economic effects of intimate partner violence.Respondents reported a range of educational, career, and economic effects of IPV.

This report examines the educational, career, and economic effects of intimate partner violence by presenting findings from a survey of 164 survivors developed by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) and administered at transitional housing programs, shelters, and other domestic violence programs in 11 states and the District of Columbia.

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Twenty-two percent of those who experienced property theft or destruction estimated the value of this property to be more than $10,000.

• Fifty-nine percent of respondents said they had an abusive partner who harmed their credit score in one or ways, such as not paying bills or paying them late, taking out more credit, maintaining high credit card balances, or defaulting on a loan.

Nearly all respondents to the survey were women, and 71 percent were between the ages of 25 and 44 (with an average age of 38).

Most respondents said they have experienced multiple forms of abuse, and the majority (56 percent) have experienced abuse from more than one partner, often beginning at a young age.

For some, this harassment at work may compound the effects of IPV.

Responses to the survey also point to other ways that abusive relationships financially affected survivors and made it difficult for them to build economic security.Eighty-three percent of respondents to the IWPR survey reported that their abusive partners disrupted their ability to work.Among those who reported experiencing one or more disruptions, 70 percent said they were not able to have a job when they wanted or needed one, and 53 percent said they lost a job because of the abuse.Seventy-three percent of respondents said they had stayed with an abusive partner longer than they wanted or returned to them for economic reasons.Many of those surveyed, however, expressed optimism that with the right resources, they will flourish and thrive.Among those who reported having their credit score harmed, 66 percent said it prevented them from getting a loan, 63 percent said it prevented them from getting housing, and 21 percent said it prevented them from getting a job.In addition, 21 percent said that having their credit score harmed had another impact on their life, such as keeping them from returning to school or setting up utilities in their name.Eighty-nine percent are parents; 55 percent have children aged four or younger.The survey reveals how the economic dimensions of abuse permeate survivors’ lives, creating a complex set of needs that make it difficult to exit abusive relationships and move forward in recovery.Ten percent reported that it was between ,000 and ,000, and 13 percent said it was more than ,000 (about 11 percent said they did not know or chose not to answer).• Eighty-two percent of respondents said their abuser damaged, destroyed, or took their personal property.

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